The Baynton-Williams Gallery

 

Antique Maps & Views of Europe

 

Benelux Countries

John Senex: NetherlandsJohn Senex.
The VII United Provinces Corrected from the Observations communicated to the Royal Society at London, & ye Royal Academy at Paris. Humbly Dedicated to Elihu Yale Esq., of Place Grove in Denbighshire. by his Obliged Humble Servant Ion Senex F.R.S. 1709.
I. Senex Sculp.
Engraving  with original wash colour.  Three vertical folds, the left hand fold has been repaired and strengthened and has some staining. The centre fold has a small area of paper loss at the bottom, now repaired. In good overall condition considering its size.
Map of the Dutch Republic, founded in 1581, as the Low Countries strove for independence from Spain. While the southern states (basically modern Belgium and Luxembourg) reverted to Spanish control, the seven northern provinces (the modern Netherlands) became the state shown here. In the next century the Republic ascended into a 'Golden Age' and developed a world colonial empire far outweighing its resources. By the 18th century it experienced a decline, exhausted by its long wars and its colonial empire was eclipsed by that of Britain. In 1795 the republic collapsed under the impact of the Dutch democratic revolution and invading French armies.
The title includes a dedication to Elihu Yale Esq. (1649-1721), an English merchant and philanthropist. Although Yale was born in Boston, he spent his career in the service of the East India Company, where he made a fortune in India. He made many financial donations to Yale University, which was renamed in his honour in 1718. Yale retired to England during his later years, where he remained until his death in 1721. The map was engraved by Senex, one of the foremost English cartographic publishers of the early 18th century.
Two sheets conjoined, total 650 x 945mm.
£400
Van Ryne: AmsterdamPieter van Ryne.
A View of the River Amstel within the Town towards the Sluse the Blue Bridge and the Orphan house of the Poor taken from the Bridge over the Amstel. Amsterdam.
P. Van Ryne delin. Publish'd According to the Act of Parliament. Published 12th May, 1794 by LAURIE & WHITTLE, 53 Fleet Street, London.
Engraving  with fine original hand colour.  Margins are somewhat stained but the image is clear.
205 x 395mm.
£300

 

France

Mortier: Gulf of GasconyPierre Mortier.
Carte du Golfe de Gascogne contentant les costs de France et d'Espagne depuis l'Isle d'Ouessant jusqu'au Cap de Finisterre. Levee et Gravee Par Ordre du Roy. A. Paris. 1693.
[Amsterdam, Pierre Mortier, 1693.]
Engraving  with original hand colour.  The lower margin has been cut and rejoined for no apparent reason. Some repaired marginal tears. Two small areas of paper loss in the upper and left margin outside the platemark.
A large chart of the Bay of Biscay, with the western coasts of France and northern coast of Spain. It was published in an Amsterdam edition of Hubert Jaillot's 'Neptune Francois', which Mortier pirated with the collusion of Jaillot (who had fallen out with his original partners). This Dutch edition was the largest, most sumptuous and expensive sea-atlas produced in the 17th century.
A strong impression and in good condition considering its size.
Two sheets conjoined, total 725 x 920mm.
£375

Sanson ProvenceSANSON, Nicolas.
COMTE,et GOUVERNMENT DE PROVENCE
Engraved by R. Cordier. Published in 1652.
Original outline colour. Some manuscript margin annotations in pencil, ink and orange crayon.
Plate fault in lower margin. Large margins.
Measures to platemark 320 x 460mm
£ 150

Stanfield: Wreckers off CalaisTo George Watson Taylor, Esq., M.P., This Plate of THE WRECKERS OFF FORT ROUGE, Calais in the distance. Is by permission dedicated by the obliged and obedient humble servants, Clarkson Stanfield and J. P. Quilley.
London, Published Feby. 1, 1833, by Ackermann & Co., 96 Strand.
A wonderful mezzotint engraved by J. P. Quilley after a painting by Clarkson Stanfield. Shows a wreck in the distance with wreckers in boats with their booty in very high seas.
Image size 580 x 670mm.
£ 350
 

Greece

De L'isle: Ancient GreeceGuillaume De L'Isle.
Graeciae Pars Meridionalis I.Ii Craecia Antiqua [&] Graeciae Pars Septentionalis.
Published 12th May. 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, London.
Engraving  with original outline colour.  Slight staining in the central fold of both maps and damage to the margins outside the platemark.
Fascinating and detailed copper plate two sheet map of Ancient Greece. Greece then stretched from the Adriatic to the Black Sea, published in J. B. B. D'Anville's atlas Complete Body of Ancient Geography. The main title is in a decorative cartouche on sheet one.
Guillaume de L'Isle and his family were perhaps the foremost French map makers of the 18th Century; Laurie and Whittle took over the publishing business of Robert Sayer at 53 Fleet Street on his death in 1794.
Two sheets, each 475 x 645mm.
£350

 

Italy

James Merigot.
Aquatint plates from A SELECT COLLECTION OF VIEWS AND RUINS IN ROME.
James Merigot was of French origin, moving to London in about 1791.  He became a drawing master as well as an accomplished aquatint engraver.

The publication lines differ throughout the plates but were published between 1796 and 1798 by: J. Merigot, 28 Haymarket, & R. Edwards 142 New Bond St.

Platemark of each c.210 x 275mm, many watermarked Whatman 1794.

The plates are listed according to the Abbey (Travel, Vol. 1, no. 178) collation but also have manuscript numbers in the top right corner which bear no relation to Abbey’s listing.

£40 ea

Merigot Rome: The Arch of Septimus Severus Plate 2: Arch of Septimus Severus.
Merigot Rome: The Temple of Concord Plate 3: The Temple of Concord.
Merigot Rome: The Temple of Antoninus And Faustina Plate 4: Temple of Antoninus And Faustina.
Merigot Rome: The Arch of Pantani Plate 5: Arch of Pantani.
Merigot Rome: The Temple of Peace Plate 6: The Temple of Peace.
Merigot Rome: Titus's Arch Plate 8: Titus's Arch.
Merigot Rome: The Temple of Remus and Romulus. Plate 13: Temple of Remus and Romulus.
Merigot Rome: Janus's Arch Plate 14: Janus's Arch.
Merigot Rome: Ponte Rotto Plate 18: Ponte Rotto.
Merigot Rome: Arch of St. Lazare Plate 19: Arch of St. Lazare.
Merigot Rome: Pyramid of Caius Cestius Plate 20: The Pyramid of Caius Cestius.
Merigot Rome: Latin Gate. Plate 21: Latin Gate.
Merigot Rome: Gate of St. Sebastian Plate 22: The Gate of St. Sebastian.
Merigot Rome: Fountain of the Nymph Egeria Plate 25: Fountain of the Nymph Egeria.
Merigot Rome: Arch of Dolabella Plate 27: The Arch of Dolabella.
Merigot Rome: Church of St. Andrew Plate 29: Church of St. Andrew.
Merigot Rome: Ponte Mole Plate 30: Ponte Mole.
Merigot Rome: Temple of Venus Plate 35: Temple of Venus.
Merigot Rome: Trophy of Marius Plate 36: Trophy of Marius.
Merigot Rome: St. Agnes's Church Plate 39: St. Agnes's Church.
Merigot Rome: Ponte Nomentano Plate 40: Ponte Nomentano.
Merigot Rome: Ponte Salaro Plate 40: Ponte Salaro.
Merigot Rome: Tower of Pignattara Plate 43: Tower of Pignattara.
Merigot Rome: Ponte Lucano Plate 44: Ponte Lucano.
Merigot Rome: Temple of the Sibill at Tivoli Plate 47: Temple of the Sibill at Tivoli.
Merigot Rome: Cascade of Tivoli Plate 48: Cascade of Tivoli.
Merigot Rome: Mercoenas Plate 52: The Cascatelle and Stables of Mercoenas
Merigot Rome: Bridge of Varus Plate 53: Bridge of Varus.
Merigot Rome: Bridge Near Vicovaro Plate 54: Bridge Near Vicovaro.
Merigot Rome: Tomb of the Horath Plate 55: Tomb of the Horath.
Merigot Rome: Hermitage at Albano Plate 56: Hermitage at Albano.
Merigot Rome: Temple of Hercules at Cori Plate 58: Temple of Hercules at Cori.
Merigot Rome: Bridge of Civita Castellana Plate 60: Bridge of Civita Castellana.
Merigot Rome: Cascade of Terni Plate 62: Cascade of Terni.
 

John Barrow.
Engravings, all probably engraved by W. Proud, published in John Barrow's 'New Geographical Dictionary, first published in London in 1759, and later by Robert Sayer.
London, 1759.

Each plate c.175 x 225mm.

 

Barrow: Florence from the Gate of St NicholasA View of Florence. Taken without the Gate of St. Nicholas, near the River Arno.
£40
Barrow: Florence All SaintsA View of the Church and Piazza of all Saints at Florence.
Engraved by W. Proud.
Trimmed just within plate at bottom.
£40
Barrow: Palace of Prince StrozziA View of the Palace of Prince Strozzi at Florence.
£40

Barrow: Florence St. Fredians GateA View of the common Fishing-Place, without St. Fredians Gate at Florence.

£40

Barrow: Florence from Cross GateA View of Florence, Taken without the Cross Gate near the River Arno.

Trimmed just within plate at bottom.
£40

Barrow: Florence Royal PalaceView of the Royal Palace at Florence.

Trimmed just within plate at bottom.

£40

Barrow: Florence  St. Peter's BridgeA View of St. Peter's Bridge at Sieve near Florence.

£40

 

 

Russia

Wyld four-sheet map of RussiaJames Wyld.
The Russian Dominions in Europe, drawn from the latest Maps, printed, Academy of Science. St. Petersburg: revised and corrected, with the Post Roads & New Governments, from the Russian Atlas of 1806; by Jasper Nantiat.
London. Published by Ja.s Wyld (Successor to Mr Faden) Geographer to His Majesty, & to H.R.H. Duke of York. Charing Cross, June 1st. 1824.
Engraving  in excellent original colour. 
A beautiful map in amazing detail, covering from the Arctic Icy Sea in the north to Black Sea and Caspian sea in the south.
Four sheets joined in pairs, each pair to plate 560 x 940mm.
£450
 

Scandinavia

Sayer map of ScandinaviaRobert Sayer.
A New Map of the Northern States Containing the Kingdoms of Sweden, Denmark, and Norway with the Western Parts of Russia, Livonia, Courland &ca.
London. Printed for Robert Sayer Fleet Street as the Act directs October 10th 1790.
Engraving  in original outline colour.  Very good condition.
A detailed map of Scandinavia and the Baltic States.
Robert Sayer was one of the leading publishers of his day. He acquired the large stock of both the Overton family and Thomas Jefferys, with whom he published a number of important maps of America. In 1775 he entered partnership with John Bennett, which lasted until 1786. Sayer continued alone, and later employed two assistants, Laurie and Whittle, who continued the business after his death in 1794.
494 x 670mm.
£270
 

Spain & Portugal

Laurie & Whittle: Spain and PortugalLaurie & Whittle.
A New Map of the Kingdoms of Spain and Portugal with their Principal Divisions...
Published by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, London as the Act directs, 12th May, 1794.
Engraving  with original hand colour.  Repaired lower centre margin.
Detailed map of Spain published during the French Revolutionary Wars.
275 x 500mm.
£200
De la Rochette: Spain and PortugalL.S. de la Rochette.
A Chart of the Coasts of Spain and Portugal with the Balearic Islands, and Part of the Coast of Barbary.
By L.S. De La Rochette MDCCLXXX. 2d Edition. London: Engraved and published as the Act directs, by W.m Faden, successor to the late T. Jefferys, Geogr. To the KING. Charing Cross. June 28th 1780.
Engraving  with original hand colour.  The corners of the lower left and right hand margins have been repaired.
A large chart of Iberia and the western Mediterranean, published to show the European theatre of the American War of Independence. Both the French and Spanish sided with the Americans and used the conflict as an opportunity to try to wrest Gibraltar and Minorca from Britain. Having failed to capture Gibraltar in 1779, the French and Spanish captured Minorca the year after the publication of this chart.
536 x 720mm.
£200
Thomson: Spain and PortugalJohn Thomson.
Spain & Portugal.
J. & G. Menzies sculpt. Edin.r. No. 23. Drawn & Engraved for Thomson's New General Atlas, 21st. Aug.t 1815.
Engraving  with fine original body colour.  Repaired lower centre margin.
Beautifully engraved and highly detailed map, showing the different regions of both Spain and Portugal, as well as the Balearic Islands. The map was published two months after the Battle of Waterloo.
535 x 695mm.
£150
Rapin & Tindal: TarragonaRapin & Tindal.
Plan of the Camp at Tarragona.
J. Basire sculp. For Mr Tindal's Continuation of Mr Rapin's History of England. [1750.]
Engraving    Narrow margins, repairs to folds.
Tarragona, part of Catalonia, sided with the allies against the Spanish Crown during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14).

The war was triggered by the ascension of Philip V to the Spanish throne following the death of the childless Charles II, last of the Spanish Habsburgs. As Philip was the grandson of the French Bourbon King Louis XIV (The Sun King) the rest of Europe was concerned that Philip could become king of both France and Spain, creating an unstoppable superpower. Here Tindal is dismissively referring to Philip as the Duke of Anjou, his earlier title. Philip's rival was Archduke Charles (or Charles III). After nearly 15 years of war, the Peace of Utrecht confirmed Philip as king of Spain, following his renunciation of any claim to the French throne. Charles later became Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI.

Engraved by J.Basire for Mr. Tindal's Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England. Published c. 1750.

Nicolas Tindal (1687-1774) was Rector of Alverstoke in Hampshire, Vicar of Great Waltham, Essex, Chaplain of Greenwich Hospital and a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford. He translated Frenchman Paul de Rapin's History of England, one of the few comprehensive histories written at that time. Tindal then wrote a three-volume 'Continuation', including the reigns of James II to George II.
Image 385 x 475mm.
£60
Rapin & Tindal: SaragossaRapin & Tindal.
Plan of the Battle Of Saragossa, fought Augt. 9, 1710, between the troops of the Allies under Lieut. Genl. Stanhope and the Marshal Count Staremberg, and the French under the D. of Anjou: the Emperour Charles, and the D of Anjou (King Philip) being both Present.
J. Basire sculp. For Mr Tindal's Continuation of Mr Rapin's History of England. [1750.]
Engraving    Narrow margins, repairs to folds.
The Allied armies under Marshall Starhemberg and General Stanhope defeated the Bourbon Spanish during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14).

The war was triggered by the ascension of Philip V to the Spanish throne following the death of the childless Charles II, last of the Spanish Habsburgs. As Philip was the grandson of the French Bourbon King Louis XIV (The Sun King) the rest of Europe was concerned that Philip could become king of both France and Spain, creating an unstoppable superpower. Here Tindal is dismissively referring to Philip as the Duke of Anjou, his earlier title. Philip's rival was Archduke Charles (or Charles III). After nearly 15 years of war, the Peace of Utrecht confirmed Philip as king of Spain, following his renunciation of any claim to the French throne. Charles later became Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI.

Engraved by J.Basire for Mr. Tindal's Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England. Published c. 1750.

Nicolas Tindal (1687-1774) was Rector of Alverstoke in Hampshire, Vicar of Great Waltham, Essex, Chaplain of Greenwich Hospital and a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford. He translated Frenchman Paul de Rapin's History of England, one of the few comprehensive histories written at that time. Tindal then wrote a three-volume 'Continuation', including the reigns of James II to George II.
Image 385 x 475mm.
£60
Rapin & Tindal: AlmanzaRapin & Tindal.
Plan of the Country and Camps of Almanar, the one under Charles III. And the other of the Enemy under D. Of Anjou, who was defeated by 16 Squadrons, commanded by Lieut. Genl. Stanhope, July 27. 1710.
J. Basire sculp. For Mr Tindal's Continuation of Mr Rapin's History of England. [1750.]
Engraving    Trimmed left margin, some repairs to folds.
The second battle fought at Almanza during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14).

The war was triggered by the ascension of Philip V to the Spanish throne following the death of the childless Charles II, last of the Spanish Habsburgs. As Philip was the grandson of the French Bourbon King Louis XIV (The Sun King) the rest of Europe was concerned that Philip could become king of both France and Spain, creating an unstoppable superpower. Here Tindal is dismissively referring to Philip as the Duke of Anjou, his earlier title. Philip's rival was Archduke Charles (or Charles III). After nearly 15 years of war, the Peace of Utrecht confirmed Philip as king of Spain, following his renunciation of any claim to the French throne. Charles later became Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI.

Engraved by J.Basire for Mr. Tindal's Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England. Published c. 1750.

Nicolas Tindal (1687-1774) was Rector of Alverstoke in Hampshire, Vicar of Great Waltham, Essex, Chaplain of Greenwich Hospital and a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford. He translated Frenchman Paul de Rapin's History of England, one of the few comprehensive histories written at that time. Tindal then wrote a three-volume 'Continuation', including the reigns of James II to George II.
Image 385 x 475mm.
£60
Rapin & Tindal: AlicanteRapin & Tindal.
Plan of the City and Castle of Alicant, Besieged by the Chevalier d'Asfeldt, Nov. 30th 1708 and surrendered by capitulation Apr. 19th 1709.
J. Basire sculp. For Mr Tindal's Continuation of Mr Rapin's History of England. [1750.]
Engraving    Trimmed left margin, some repairs to folds.
The siege of Alicante, which lasted for 109 days during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14).

The war was triggered by the ascension of Philip V to the Spanish throne following the death of the childless Charles II, last of the Spanish Habsburgs. As Philip was the grandson of the French Bourbon King Louis XIV (The Sun King) the rest of Europe was concerned that Philip could become king of both France and Spain, creating an unstoppable superpower. Alicante supported Philip's rival, Archduke Charles (or Charles III, later Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI) and the Allies easily took the Citadel in 1706. However the city and citadel were taken back by Claude François Bidal, marquis d'Asfeld, as shown here. After nearly 15 years of war, the Peace of Utrecht confirmed Philip as king of Spain, following his renunciation of any claim to the French throne.

Engraved by J.Basire for Mr. Tindal's Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England. Published c. 1750.

Nicolas Tindal (1687-1774) was Rector of Alverstoke in Hampshire, Vicar of Great Waltham, Essex, Chaplain of Greenwich Hospital and a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford. He translated Frenchman Paul de Rapin's History of England, one of the few comprehensive histories written at that time. Tindal then wrote a three-volume 'Continuation', including the reigns of James II to George II.
Image 385 x 475mm.
£120

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